Cave de Die Jaillance

The Cooperative Cellar was created in the 1950s under the leadership of Henri Bonnet, who gathered together a group of winegrowers who agreed to work on a cooperative basis, seeing this as a way to increase production. It was not until 2001, however, that the Jaillance brand saw the light of day. Branding allowed the cooperative to develop the scope of its influence and become a recognised expert in French sparkling wines. Armed with a new name, Jaillance also announced their intention to extend the range of sparkling wines they offered.

Le caveau à sa création
Le caveau aujourd’hui

The History of Jaillance

Jaillance as we know it wasn’t built in a day.
It started off in 1950, when a group of 266 winegrowers got together to work on a cooperative basis.

1950-1951

The Start of the Die Cooperative Cellar
266 Die winegrowers came together under the leadership of Henri Bonnet to form the Die Cooperative Cellar, which they saw as a way to expand production. This was the basis for the organisation we now know as Jaillance.

1965-1970

The Rising Popularity of Clairette de Die in France
These years saw the beginnings of the buoyant sales which still drive the company today. The first publicity campaign was launched, and a newly-formed sales team targeted supermarkets and hypermarkets in an effort to bring Clairette de Die to the areas where it was still relatively unknown.

1975-2000

Launching the Clairdie Brand
The Cooperative’s first major marketing initiative, the creation of Clairdie brand, met with enormous success. Die’s winegrowers introduced their wines and terroirs to the public via countless days of in-store tastings – and thanks to the new Clairdie brand, Clairette de Die became a household name throughout France.

2001

The Birth of Jaillance 
The creation of Jaillance solved two problems at once: it cleared up any confusion caused by the similarity between the names Clairdie and Clairette de Die, and it gave winegrowers the opportunity to add their name to a wider range of AOC sparkling wines.

2001-2007

Jaillance, the Sparkling Terroirs
Alongside its new name, Jaillance also announced a new goal: to extend the range of sparkling wines offered by the Cooperative. They began to look closely at Cave Brouette in Bourg en Gironde, a winery producing Crémant de Bordeaux; this  they subsequently purchased in a bid to drive quality as high as possible and enhance the maturing process.

2008-2014

Despite the difficult economic climate, Jaillance continues to remain buoyant. This is partly thanks to a new, sustainable communications model which reflects company’s values, quality, elegance and modernity. Jaillance are strengthening their presence at consumer level, but also continue to grow while still focusing on profitability. A new production site has been built at Peujard especially for the production of Crémant de Bordeaux, while in Die new facilities have also been added to improve production.

2015

Jaillance Today
Jaillance Cave de Die is currently the third largest agri-foods operation in the Drôme, generating over one thousand jobs. Of the 1,400 hectares of Clairette de Die and Crémant de Die vineyards in the region, the 224 members of Jaillance Cave de Die are responsible for over 1,154. Jaillance represent 72% of the AOC’s wine producers, 73% of the total vineyard area and 73% of harvest volumes. Jaillance wines have a growing number of enthusiastic followers, who come to taste (and buy) wines at the cellars in Die and Peujard. The winery welcomes some 120,000 visitors per year. Every summer sees a full programme of events attracting tourists as well as visitors who come to enjoy the local food and wine. Exports are booming, accounting for 15% of turnover in 2014 – the objective now is to double this figure by 2015. Jaillance Cooperative Cellars sell over 7,850,000 bottles of AOC Clairette de Die and Crémant de Die, and close to 500,000 bottles of Crémant de Bordeaux.
This website uses cookies. By continuing to navigate the site, you consent to our use of cookies